Teenage girl charged in recruitment of Toronto high school student into sex trade

A 17-year-old girl has been charged in connection with a human trafficking investigation that police say led to a 16-year-old Catholic high school student being recruited into prostitution.

Toronto police launched an investigation on April 12 after investigators said the 16-year-old St. Joseph’s College student was recruited by the older teenager, a former student of the same school, and introduced to two men in March 2015.

Police said the two men befriended the younger teenager and told her she could make a lot of money working for them.

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READ MORE: 80 arrested, 274 charges laid in massive Ontario-wide child porn bust

The 16-year-old girl was then “controlled through intimidation and threats” and police said she was forced to work the sex trade for the two men.

Investigators said the 17-year-old took photos of the younger in various states of undress and posted them on backpage长沙桑拿, an escort website, advertising sexual services.

The 16-year-old girl was then taken by the men to various hotels in Toronto, forced to have sex with clients and handed over all of the money to the two men, who police said also sexually assaulted the girl.

READ MORE: Man, woman from Brampton arrested in human trafficking investigation

Police arrested the 17-year-old girl, who cannot be identified under the provisions of the Youth Criminal Justice Act, and charged her with procuring a person under 18 years of age, advertising another person’s sexual services, possession of child pornography, making child pornography and distributing child pornography.

The two men had previously been arrested and charged in the investigation, but investigators believe there may be more victims.

Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 416-808-7474, Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS (8477), online at 长沙桑拿按摩论坛长沙夜生活222tips长沙桑拿, text TOR and your message to CRIMES (274637), or leave a tip on Facebook.

Alberta home insurance premiums could rise following Fort McMurray fire: analyst

Albertans and people living in wildfire-prone areas could see an increase in their insurance bills following the wildfire in Fort McMurray, according to one analyst.

“I think it’s safe to assume that the fire will become the largest insured loss in Canadian history,” said Jason Thistlethwaite, director of the Climate Change Adaptation Project at the University of Waterloo.

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  • Fort McMurray wildfire: Insurance companies begin preparing for fire claims

    A 2011 fire in Slave Lake, Alberta, destroyed 374 properties and damaged another 32, according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada’s website. Insured damage from that fire amounted to more than $700 million.

    In Fort McMurray, more than 2,400 structures were burned, according to the most recent damage assessment.

    READ MORE: ‘Ocean of fire’ destroys 2,400 structures but 85% of Fort McMurray still stands

    While it’s hard to estimate damages until insurers can survey the area, a BMO Capital Markets analysis last week estimated losses between $2.6 billion and $9 billion.

    Almost all home insurance policies cover wildfire damage. So homeowners can expect to receive a cheque for the cost of rebuilding their home, as well as some coverage for things like living expenses while forced to flee their homes and food lost in a refrigerator or smoke damage to carpets. The size of the payout is calculated based on factors including the type of damage, value of goods in the house and the type of policy purchased.

    READ MORE: Fort McMurray wildfire: Homeowners to face difficult choice of whether to rebuild

    However, getting the money might take a while. People in Slave Lake had to wait anywhere from eight months to over two years for their homes to be rebuilt, said Bill Adams, vice-president for the western and pacific region for the Insurance Bureau of Canada.

    Insurance companies could pass along payout costs to their other customers, said Thistlethwaite.

    “Insurance is a business and when the industry suffers a significant loss, it tries to recoup those losses. The insurance industry recoups those losses by assessing for risk,” he said.

    “Everyone in Canada contributes to property insurance, so we’re all contributing to offset some of the losses associated with the damage in Fort McMurray.”

    Norma Nielson, a business professor at the University of Calgary, likens it to a pebble thrown into in a pond. “The way this works is the costs will spread out, literally around the world.

    “A little like the ripple in a pond, you might see a bigger effect in Alberta, close to the pebble dropping, but the ripples may go further out.”

    That means that most people will hardly notice a difference, she said.

    Although Thistlethwaite believes there will be a noticeable increase in the cost of insurance, he isn’t picturing a massive hike. “There will be increases in the price of insurance, particularly in the province of Alberta, but I wouldn’t expect those increases to be so significant that you’re limiting the affordability of coverage.”

    Smaller insurance companies may also decide to stop covering wildfire damage, or set a cap on the amount they will pay, he said.

    Steve Kee, director for media and communications with the Insurance Bureau of Canada said he can’t speculate on insurance rates and it’s too early to tell what the fire’s effect will be.

    “Insurers set their rates based on the projected costs. One isolated event won’t affect rates that much, if at all. Insurers look at trends over several years,” he said.

    “Our members are all going to have different experiences and different exposure in these regions. It is too early to speculate on rates as we haven’t even got the numbers in on damages. Some consumers may alter coverage, raise deductibles, etc. to maintain consistency on premiums but really it is too early to tell.”

    This is just how insurance works, said Nielson. “That’s the deal we make when we buy insurance: that if we’re lucky enough not to have our house burn, the money gets used to pay people who did.”

    Loss prevention

    Thistlethwaite hopes that following the fire in Fort McMurray, governments pay more attention to what can be done to prevent massive losses, rather than just relying on insurance to cover them.

    It might be better to encourage people to build in less-risky areas, like further from the tree line, he said, or funding municipalities to put in safeguards.

    “The more money that we put into reducing our vulnerability to extreme weather and natural disasters, the cheaper our insurance will be. It’s that simple.”

    With files from the Canadian Press

New Trudeau airport jetty embraces distinct Montreal look

MONTREAL – Pierre-Elliott Trudeau airport unveiled its new international jetty Thursday.

At a cost of $350 million, the goal was to create an area that would be “distinctively Montreal.”

READ MORE: Dorval ‘overpass to nowhere’ could finally link Trudeau airport, highways

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    “We want people to come here and sense, when you’re in this airport that you’re still in Montreal,” said James Cherry, CEO of Aéroports de Montréal.

    “I used to find that when I travel in an airport I’d say ‘I see the same stores everywhere, I could be in Winnipeg or Denver or St. Louis or Minneapolis’ and I couldn’t tell from inside the airport.”

    “We want people to come into our airport and say ‘this is definitely Montreal.’”

    In addition to a signature Montreal food truck, there are new shops and boutiques, as well as 1,000 chairs equipped with charging stations.

    Outside, there is room for new wide-body aircraft, including the Airbus a-380, the largest airliner in the world.

    READ MORE: Residents concerned about noise levels near Trudeau Airport want to be heard

    Cherry said the improvements provide more space for passengers.

    Trudeau airport’s new international jetty opens to passengers on Thursday.

Stephen Curry is first unanimous NBA MVP, takes honour again

OAKLAND, Calif. – From the jaw-dropping half-court heaves that somehow sink through the net to the dazzling drives and zippy passes from every which way, Stephen Curry’s desire to keep getting better while always trying to entertain at every stop has the Golden State superstar being mentioned right along with the best ever, Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson.

And he just turned 28. There might still be so much more for the 6-foot-3, baby-faced point guard whose ability to make it on the big NBA stage was initially questioned by some.

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On Tuesday, Curry accomplished something those former greats never did: He became the first unanimous NBA MVP, earning the award for the second straight season after leading the defending champion Warriors to a record-setting season.

“I never really set out to change the game. I never thought that would happen in my career,” Curry said. “What I wanted to do was just be myself. … I know it inspires a lot of the next generation, a lot of people who love the game of basketball to value the skill of it, value the fact that you can work every single day to get better. You’ve got to be able to put the time and the work. That’s how I got here, that’s how I continue to get better every single day.

Curry is the 11th player in league history to be voted MVP in consecutive seasons and the first guard since Steve Nash in 2004-05 and 2005-06. Curry received 1,310 points from the 130 media voters from the U.S. and Canada.

“I couldn’t imagine anybody not voting him first, and yet there always seems to be somebody who has to stand out,” Coach of the Year Steve Kerr said.

Curry was followed in the vote by Kawhi Leonard of San Antonio, LeBron James of Cleveland and Oklahoma City teammates Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant. Curry’s teammate Draymond Green was seventh.

Nash, Golden State’s player development consultant, was on hand to congratulate Curry.

WATCH: Obama ‘mentors’ NBA star Steph Curry at the White House

“It’s been weird, I haven’t had to say a word to him. It’s been the easiest job,” Nash said.

Curry is the first two-time MVP in franchise history, and Wilt Chamberlain (1959-60) is the only other Warriors winner. After guiding Golden State to its first championship in 40 years, Curry & Co. took that success even further to finish with 73 regular-season wins to top the mark set by the 1995-96 Chicago Bulls team that went 72-10.

In a stunning overtime performance Monday night, Curry showed exactly how he can take over a game in a matter of seconds. He returned from a sprained right knee to score 40 points — and 17 in overtime — in a 132-125 win at Portland to put his team up 3-1 in the Western Conference semifinals.

Curry was sore and fatigued but ready to go again.

“He wants it,” Kerr said. “There’s no ulterior motive. He just wants to be better. That’s who he is.”

Curry, now one of the most recognizable and popular athletes worldwide, was presented with his MVP trophy at Oracle Arena before trying to close out the series against the Trail Blazers at home Wednesday night. His teammates were on stage to cheer the latest accomplishment in a long list of them.

“He’s become one of the most popular athletes on the planet,” Kerr said. “People relate to him. They genuinely enjoy watching him play and admire his humility and just the way he carries himself. The impact he’s had on the game is really dramatic.”

Curry averaged an NBA-best 30.1 points per game to go with 6.7 assists and 5.4 rebounds. He also led the NBA with 2.1 steals a game while shooting 50.4 per cent from the field, 45.4 per cent from 3-point range and 90.8 per cent from the foul line.

From the start of the season, Curry vowed to take his game to another level — and did he ever. Now, all that matters to him is staying healthy and leading the Warriors to another title.

Curry understands, and even embraces, the constant scrutiny that comes with being an MVP and playing on a championship team.

His pregame ballhandling routine alone draws huge crowds in every city, but it has been his long-range touch that has forced defences to extend — and has kids and adults alike throwing the ball up from anywhere. He made a record 402 3-pointers after no player had previously even hit 300 in a season.

“I want to be remembered as somebody that worked hard, that got the most out of my potential and talent and pushed the envelope,” Curry said. “I never really expected to change the game or spark a new way to play the game, because that’s the way I know how to play, and that’s what was in me when I started the game back when I was 5.”

Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: May 2016

Every day on Global News at 6 and Global News at 10, we feature a viewer submitted photo for Your Saskatchewan.

To submit a picture for Your Saskatchewan, email to [email protected]长沙夜网.

Pictures should be at least 920 pixels wide and in jpeg format.

GALLERY: Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: April 2016

May 1: Chris Attrell took this Your Saskatchewan photo of a rubber ducky floating in the puddles left over after the snowmelt in Shaunavon.

Chris Attrell / Viewer Submitted

May 2: Gerry Lopaschuk took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Elbow of boats getting ready for Lake Diefenbaker.

Gerry Lopaschuk / Viewer Submitted

May 3: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Art Rachul near the Saskatoon Rowing Club.

Art Rachul / Viewer Submitted

May 4: Brenda Reifferscheid took this Your Saskatchewan photo of tree buds in Humboldt.

Brenda Reifferscheid / Viewer Submitted

May 5: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken in Vanscoy by Margaret Flack of a robin enjoying a bath on a hot day.

Margaret Flack / Viewer Submitted

May 6: This Your Saskatchewan photo of a smoky sunset in Wilkie was taken by Hank Vlietstra.

Hank Vlietstra / Viewer Submitted

May 7: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Jorden Olson by Highway 7 just outside Saskatoon.

Jorden Olson / Viewer Supplied

May 8: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Laurette Childs while doing morning chores near Killaly.

Laurette Childs / Viewer Supplied

May 9: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Bradley Pilon in Saskatoon.

Bradley Pilon / Viewer Submitted

May 10: Annette McCann took this Your Saskatchewan photo at Bigstone Lake.

Annette McCann / Viewer Submitted

Teena Kovitch took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Allen.

Teena Kovitch / Viewer Submitted

May 12: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken east of Regina by Joshua Zorn.

Joshua Zorn / Viewer Submitted

May 13: Global Saskatoon’s Lisa Ford took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Saskatoon.

Lisa Ford / Global News

May 14: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Chloe Dreger of a robin’s nest in a pine tree in Watrous.

Chloe Dreger / Viewer Supplied

May 15: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Patti in Prince Albert.

Patti / Viewer Supplied

May 16: Elaine Kaloustian took this Your Saskatchewan photo at Lac La Ronge of a helicopter in a firefighting operation.

Elaine Kaloustian / Viewer Submitted

May 17: This Your Saskatchewan photo of a blooming crab apple tree was taken by Bud and Debbie Callaway at Beaver Creek.

Bud and Debbie Callaway / Viewer Submitted

May 18: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Mark Kindrachuk of Tuesday evening’s double rainbow over Saskatoon.

Mark Kindrachuk / Viewer Supplied

May 19: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Gina Rea at Murray Lake.

Gina Rea / Viewer Supplied

May 20: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Roxanne Bartel near Saskatoon of her late father, Henry, checking his fields.

Roxanne Bartel / Viewer Supplied

May 21: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Darcy Conn of the Milky Way near McLean.

Darcy Conn / Viewer Supplied

May 22: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Marilyn McIntyre of a sunset near Rosetown.

Marilyn McIntyre / Viewer Supplied

May 23: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Susan Sagen of two bulls near Kenaston.

Susan Sagen / Viewer Supplied

May 24: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Bruce Johnson of Saturday night’s thunderstorm in Saskatoon.

Bruce Johnson / Viewer Supplied

May 25: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Brent Bell at Picnic Lake Saturday night.

Viewer Submitted

May 26: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Marissa Alarcon of the lighthouse in Cochin.

Marissa Alarcon / Viewer Supplied

May 27: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Lana Henry at Pelican Narrows.

Lana Henry / Viewer Supplied

May 28: Gwen Rudolph took this Your Saskatchewan photo at Turtle Lake.

May 29: This Your Saskatchewan photo of the St. Louis Bridge was taken by Terry Prosper.

May 29: This Your Saskatchewan photo of the St. Louis Bridge was taken by Terry Prosper.

Terry Prosper / Viewer Submitted

May 30: This Your Saskatchewan photo of a busy bee in an apple tree was taken by Bruce Williams in Outlook.

Bruce Williams / Viewer Submitted

May 31: This Your Saskatchewan photo of a cat up a tree was taken by Jenine Boser.

Jenine Boser / Viewer Submitted


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Related

  • Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: March 2016

  • Your Saskatchewan: February 2016

  • Your Saskatchewan: January 2016

UPDATE: 11-year-old sees herself for the first time since carnival accident ripped off her scalp

A Nebraska family is demanding answers after an accident at a local carnival ripped the hair and scalp off their 11-year-old daughter and damaged muscles in her face.

Elizabeth Gilreath, 11, was on the King’s Crown, a spinning teacups-type ride at the Omaha, Neb. Cinco de Mayo festival when her long hair became tangled in the ride.

“It went on for five to 10 minutes, everybody told me while it ripped and pulled my daughter around,” the girl’s father, Timothy Gilreath, told reporters.

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    “They don’t even know if the muscles will work and my daughter will be able to see again. That is our baby.”

    Gilreath remains in hospital, however her family says she is making steady improvement. Initially, the muscle damage was so severe, she was unable to open her eyelids or speak, communicating via hand squeezes.

    “I can’t let my daughter see [me cry],” her mother, Virginia Cooksey, told reporters last week. “I have to stay strong.”

    “She was tortured,” Gilreath said.

    READ MORE: ‘It was horrendous’: Mom saves daughter’s life after broken-neck water slide accident

    But as of Tuesday Gilreath has made significant progress from her initial injury. A post from on her mother Virgina’s Facebook page says Gilreath has managed to open one of her eyes.

    BELOW: Mother posts photo of Elizabeth Gilreath seeing herself in a mirror for the first time since the accident

    Slide

    “Lulu is stronger than me. My baby girl saw herself for the first time today,” Cooksey wrote. “The way she handled it [gave] me strength.”

    Attached was a photo of the little girl’s reaction upon seeing herself in a mirror for the first time since the accident. Despite her still-disfigured face, there was, crucially, a smile on her face.

    Cooksey says her daughter still can’t see out of her left eye. She’s scheduled to undergo surgery this Saturday.

    The initial accident happened around 1:30 p.m. Surveillance video from a nearby business shows the dramatic moments as the crowd, including Elizabeth’s family and friends, became aware of the accident.

    “There’s nothing we could do and so I stood up and I was like yelling, I was like, ‘Stop the ride! Stop the freaking ride!” Elizabeth’s friend, Aushanay Allen, told WOWT News in Omaha.

    “I wanted her to live,” said Jolene Cisneros, a woman who ran to try to halt the ride. “Please don’t let her pass. My prayers are with her. I want her to know that she’s loved and cared about and it’s going to be okay. She’s still here with us and I’m grateful for that.”

    Surveillance video also captured the ride operator fleeing from the scene after the accident. The family wants to know why he appeared to ignore the injured girl.

    “I don’t understand how this man didn’t notice my daughter laying on the ground,” said Cooksey.

    READ MORE: Canada’s oldest wooden roller coaster set to open for another season

    In a statement to the media, the company which owns the rides – Thomas D. Thomas Shows – says passenger safety is their top priority.

    “Thomas D. Thomas Shows values the safety and health of our guests above all else and we are saddened by this accident … The thoughts and prayers of everyone at Thomas D. Thomas Shows are with the young girl and her family during this extremely difficult time.”

    According to state records, the King’s Crown ride was last inspected in March. The carnival company is pledging its full cooperation as the investigation into the accident continues.

Age and income top factors in staying with single employer: poll

CHICAGO – A new poll says more than 40 per cent of America’s baby boomers stayed with their employer for more than 20 years. But it’s unlikely that their children or grandchildren will experience the same job tenure.

The survey of more than 1,000 Americans 50 and older by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows that 41 per cent of those employed workers have spent two decades with the same company, including 18 per cent who’ve stayed at least 30 years.

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    But it’s a trend more common among the older baby boomers than younger ones, and traditional pensions appear to be one of the driving factors.

    Among those who have had at least 20 years with a single employer, the survey found that about half are excited about retirement, but a third are anxious about their post-work lives.

    READ MORE: Want to retire at 65? Here’s how much you need to save

    David McQuinn, 61, is retiring Tuesday after 30 years with MiTek, a construction and engineering firm in suburban St. Louis. He says there were times he thought about leaving but he liked his co-workers and his senior position and also owned stock in the company.

    “I started working young and I’ve been a man in a hurry my whole life,” he says, “and now I’m in a hurry to not be in a hurry.”

    His experience exemplifies a trait among boomers: more attachment to the company than the younger generations. But even among older Americans there’s a gap in employment tenure: Half of those aged 65 and up but only a third of those age 50 to 64 have stayed with the same employer for at least two decades.

    The shift may be less about differences in attitude than changes in jobs — and benefits.

    About two-thirds of those who stayed with one employer for 20 or more years had a pension, according to the survey, compared with only a third of those who had never stayed that long with one employer.

    Those defined benefit pension plans are slowly disappearing. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that only 18 per cent of private workers were covered by these plans in 2011, down from 35 per cent in the early 1990s. More common now are plans like 401(k)s, which are more portable from one employer to another.

    The agency has reported that a larger proportion of older workers than younger workers had more tenure on the job. For example it said, in January 2014, the average tenure with the current employer was 7.9 years for people 45 to 54, compared to 10.4 years for those 55 to 64.

    “Think of all the choices people have today. I mean, who ever heard of a social-media analyst five years ago?” says Joe Coughlin, the director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s AgeLab.

    Coughlin says higher churn in the labour market also means companies will have to work harder to hire and retain the workers they need, and this creates leverage.

    “Millennials think this way instinctively,” he said. “They’ve seen their parents laid off by these large corporations, so there is less trust.”

    READ MORE: Millennials and the changing world of work

    Christina Guerrero worked in the mid-1980s as a housekeeper at Austin’s Brackenridge Hospital before applying for and getting a job as a clinical assistant.

    She kept that job for 17 years, before moving to a neighbouring children’s hospital. Lifting children into hospital beds, she recalls, was easier on her back then moving adults.

    “I thought about looking for other jobs, but almost any hospital these days would require me to go back to school to finish my GED, so that was a big reason for staying put,” says Guerrero, now 61.

    According to the AP-NORC survey, younger baby boomers were much more likely to have gone back to school in the past five years: 30 per cent of those age 50-64, compared to 19 per cent of those 65 and older.

    Most went for additional training because their employer required it or they wanted to learn something new or fun. Only 17 per cent said they received training to start a new career.

    READ MORE: Job interview questions: possible curve-balls to watch out for

    Joe Abraham, 65, says he’s sure he “dodged a few bullets along the way” during his 36-year career as an attorney at Ford Motor Co.

    Now retired, he says the raises and benefits he got from Ford were not worth giving up for something else. Plus, he just liked his colleagues.

    ___

    The AP-NORC Center survey was conducted March 8-27 by NORC at the University of Chicago, with funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. It involved online and telephone interviews with 1,075 people aged 50 and older nationwide, most of whom are members of NORC’s probability-based AmeriSpeak panel. Results from the full survey have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3.9 percentage points.

    AmeriSpeak respondents were first selected randomly using address-based sampling methods, and later interviewed online or by phone. Sixteen respondents interviewed in Spanish were re-contacted after participating in an earlier telephone survey.

    ___

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Adam Allington is studying aging and workforce issues as part of a 10-month fellowship at The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, which joins NORC’s independent research and AP journalism. The fellowship is funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

    ___

    News survey specialist Emily Swanson contributed to this report from Washington.

Jon Bon Jovi opens hunger centre in town hit hard by Hurricane Sandy

TOMS RIVER, N.J. – Jon Bon Jovi knows he can’t help society by curing cancer or splitting atoms. But he can use his celebrity to command the attention of millions of people, including some of the wealthiest and most powerful.

The Sayreville, New Jersey-born rocker and his wife, Dorothea, are joining with local charities and wealthy fellow philanthropists to tackle hunger and poverty in a shore town that was devastated by Superstorm Sandy.

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READ MORE: A look back at Sandy

He and his Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation held a grand opening Tuesday for the B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together. The centre in Toms River is designed as a one-stop facility to help people get food stamps, health care and culinary-related job training. It also provides meals for at-risk children and seniors.

Surrounded by crates of potatoes, apples and turnips and pallets of canned ravioli and green beans, the singer best known for rock anthems like “Livin’ On A Prayer,” ”You Give Love A Bad Name” and “Wanted Dead Or Alive” said hunger is something he can actually do something about.

“We didn’t need scientists to find a cure,” he said. “There are so many wonderful causes and so many passionate people that are addressing them. We have been inspired by so many of our in-need neighbours who have come seeking help.”

He and several others active with the centre said one of its main goals is not just to feed the lines at food pantries but to also permanently shorten them. The centre will house a second JBJ Soul Kitchen community restaurant, where diners pay a minimum $10 donation or do volunteer work for their meals. The first one opened in 2011 in Red Bank.

READ MORE: 1 year on Sandy survivors to light up shore

Bon Jovi says many area residents are still recovering from Sandy and don’t have enough nutritious food to eat. But he says the need predated the storm in Ocean County, where one in five residents is low-income or lives below the poverty level of $15,000 a year for a family of four.

“This is happening across our nation,” he said. “When there’s 15 per cent of children going to be hungry at night in a nation like ours, that’s not an issue it takes a scientist to solve.”

Toms River was one of the hardest-hit communities during Sandy, which struck Oct. 29, 2012. The nearby Ortley Beach section was devastated, and many homes and businesses still have not been rebuilt as the fourth summer after the storm approaches.

Bon Jovi is partnering with the Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, The Peoples Pantry and the David Tepper Charitable Foundation to provide $5 million in services to needy families in the B.E.A.T. Center’s first year of operation.

The centre joins other charitable endeavours undertaken by Bon Jovi, including the construction of 440 units of affordable housing for homeless or low-income families and donations to numerous Sandy relief efforts.

Stephen Curry is 1st unanimous NBA MVP, wins 2nd straight award

OAKLAND, Calif. – Stephen Curry is the first unanimous NBA MVP, earning the award for the second straight season Tuesday after leading the defending champion Warriors to a record-setting season.

The Golden State superstar is the 11th player in NBA history to be voted MVP in consecutive seasons and the first guard to do so since Steve Nash in 2004-05 and 2005-06. Curry received 1,310 points from the 130 media voters from the U.S. and Canada.

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He was followed in the vote by Kawhi Leonard of San Antonio, LeBron James of Cleveland and Oklahoma City teammates Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant. Curry’s teammate Draymond Green was seventh.

Curry is the first two-time winner in franchise history, and Wilt Chamberlain (1959-60) is the lone other Warriors winner. After guiding Golden State to its first championship in 40 years, Curry and Co. took that success even further to finish with a record 73 regular-season wins to top the 1995-96 Chicago Bulls team that went 72-10.

READ MORE: Golden State Warriors roll into second round of playoffs without Stephen Curry

In a stunning overtime performance Monday night, Curry showed exactly how he can take over a game in a matter of seconds. He returned from a sprained right knee to score 40 points – and 17 in overtime – in a 132-125 win at Portland to put his team up 3-1 in the Western Conference semifinals.

“I figured that he’d find his stroke and make a few shots but I mean that was, that was crazy,” said Steve Kerr, who was voted NBA Coach of the Year last month.

Curry will be presented with t4rophy Tuesday afternoon at Oracle Arena before trying to close out the series against the Trail Blazers at home Wednesday night.

With that jaw-dropping long-range touch from way, way back and dazzling ballhandling, Curry made a record 402 3-pointers after no player had previously even hit 300 in a season. He averaged an NBA-best 30.1 points per game to go with 6.7 assists and 5.4 rebounds. He also led the NBA with 2.1 steals a game while shooting 50.4 per cent from the field, 45.4 per cent from 3-point range and 90.8 per cent from the foul line.

From the start of the season, Curry vowed to take his game to another level – and did he ever. Now, all that matters to Curry is staying healthy to lead the Warriors to another title.

“The reason Steph is as good as he is because he can score from anywhere,” Kerr said. “If you take away the 3 he can penetrate and hit the floaters or get to the rim.”

Your Manitoba: May 2016

Your Manitoba May 31; St. Laurent, Man.

Submitted by: Daryle Friesen

Your Manitoba May 31; Rock Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Shirley Thompson

Your Manitoba May 31; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: James Panas

Your Manitoba May 31; Carman, Man.

Submitted by: Lori Wiebe

Your Manitoba May 31; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Gail Cabana-Coldwell

Your Manitoba May 24; Big Whiteshell Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Shauna Enns

Your Manitoba May 24; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Corrinne Adshead

Your Manitoba May 24; Selkirk, Man.

Photo Credit: Tom Walker

Your Manitoba May 24; Amaranth Beach, Man.

Submitted by: Taralynne Kleemola

Your Manitoba May 24; Gretna, Man.

Submitted by: Susie Teichroeb

Your Manitoba May 19; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Irene Hawkes

Your Manitoba May 19; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Sherry P.

Your Manitoba May 19; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Michael Gordon

Your Manitoba May 19; Lake Francis, Man.

Submitted by: Brett Taplin

Your Manitoba May 19; Teulon, Man.

Submitted by: Dennis Vande

Your Manitoba May 17; Dorothy Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Michele Sobering

Your Manitoba May 17; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Neil Longmuir

Your Manitoba May 17; Boissevain, Man.

Submitted by: Stella Lone

Your Manitoba May 17; Portage la Prairie, Man.

Submitted by: Carly Kontzie

Your Manitoba May 17; Roland, Man.

Submitted by: Rusty Graham

Your Manitoba May 13; Ile des Chenes, Man.

Submitted by: Kaitlyn Kalyniuk

Your Manitoba May 13; Pierson, Man.

Submitted by: Gail Daniels

Your Manitoba May 13; Ste. Anne, Man.

Submitted by: Claudette Gabbs

Your Manitoba May 13; Gretna, Man.

Submitted by: Susie Teichroeb

Your Manitoba May 13; Stonewall, Man.

Submitted by: MaryAnn Wollman

Your Manitoba May 11; Gimli, Man.

Submitted by: Joan Mayhew

Your Manitoba May 11; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Neil Longmuir

Your Manitoba May 11′ Steinbach, Man.

Submitted by: A. Friesen

Your Manitoba May 11; St. Claude, Man.

Submitted by: Louise Rosset

Your Manitoba May 9; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Jeremy Desrochers

Your Manitoba May 9; Headingley, Man.

Submitted by: Allan Robertson

Your Manitoba May 9; Lake Manitoba, Man.

Submitted by: Shelly Fedoruk

Your Manitoba May 9; Clear Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Karen Morissette

Your Manitoba May 9; Tolstoi, Man.

Submitted by: Neil Kroese

Your Manitoba May 5; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Carrie Bazylewski

Your Manitoba May 5; Lockport, Man.

Submitted by: Neil Longmuir

Your Manitoba May 5; Gimli, Man.

Submitted by: Ryan Ostertag

Your Manitoba May 5; Morris, Man.

Submitted by: Jennifer Rhymer

Your Manitoba May 5; Winnipeg, Man.

Photo Credit: Ray Cloutier

Your Manitoba May 3; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Celina Flett

Your Manitoba May 3; Norway House, Man.

Submitted by: Nadine Williams

Your Manitoba May 3; Pinawa, Man.

Submitted by: Ken Reddig

Your Manitoba May 3; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Juan Arriola

Your Manitoba May 4; St. Norbert, Man.

Submitted by: Harold & Esther

Your Manitoba May 2; Oak Hammock Marsh, Man.

Submitted by: Catherine Sproat

Your Manitoba May 2; Buffalo Point Resort, Man.

Submitted by: Liz Nicholls

Your Manitoba May 2; Homewood, Man.

Submitted by: Al Filleul

Your Manitoba May 2; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Gary Zuk

Your Manitoba May 2; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Darlene Kaye

Your Manitoba May 4; East St. Paul, Man.

Submitted by: Al Yakimchuk

Your Manitoba May 4; Riverton, Man.

Submitted by: Vince Pahkala

Your Manitoba May 4; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Jeff Vernaus

Your Manitoba May 4; St. Laurent, Man.

Submitted by: Daryle Friesen

Your Manitoba May 4; R.M. Springfield, Man.

Submitted by: John Gowron

Your Manitoba May 6; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Kathleen Fonseca

Your Manitoba May 6; Minnedosa Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Barb Hanishewski

Your Manitoba May 6; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Vic Ferrier

Your Manitoba May 6; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Annette

Your Manitoba May 10; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: James Panas

Your Manitoba May 10; Lee River, Man.

Submitted by: Dave Blayden

Your Manitoba May 10; Oak Hammock Marsh, Man.

Submitted by: Leslie Mehner

Your Manitoba May 10; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Linda Caldwell

Your Manitoba May 12; Carberry, Man.

Submitted by: Brenda Rosset

Your Manitoba May 12; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Diana Roth

Your Manitoba May 12; Riverton, Man.

Submitted by: Vince Pahkala

Your Manitoba May 12; Altona, Man.

Submitted by: Laurie Braun

Your Manitoba May 12; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Nancy Guille

Your Manitoba May 16; Lake Brereton, Man.

Submitted by: Alex Manaigre

Your Manitoba May 16; West St. Paul, Man.

Submitted by: Leon Formela

Your Manitoba May 16; Rocky Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Tyler Post

Your Manitoba May 16; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Kathleen Harris

Your Manitoba May 16; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Sandra Chapko

Your Manitoba May 18; Lac du Bonnet, Man.

Submitted by: Elmer Pawliuk

Your Manitoba May 18; St. Anne, Man.

Submitted by: Krista Bachinski

Your Manitoba May 18; Sandy Hook, Man.

Submitted by: Leslie Mehner

Your Manitoba May 18; Laurier, Man.

Submitted by: Faye Soucey

Your Manitoba May 20′ Deception Bay, Man.

Submitted by: Nancy Mann

Your Manitoba May 20; Clearwater Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Andre Brandt

Your Manitoba May 20; Riverton, Man.

Submitted by: Jody Stoyanowski

Your Manitoba May 20; Patricia Prov. Park, Man.

Submitted by: John Dalebozik

Your Manitoba May 20; Dorothy Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Len Trotter

Your Manitoba May 25; Macara Lake, ON.

Submitted by: Emma McLachlan

Your Manitoba May 25; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Susan Walker

Your Manitoba May 25; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Neil Longmuir

Your Manitoba May 25; Brandon, Man.

Submitted by: Melissa Spence

Your Manitoba May 25; Stonewall, Man.

Submitted by: Thaye


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